On Life

Thoughts on Missing Working in Baseball

Orioles friends from our reunion a few years ago.

It’s a question I get asked a lot.

“Do you miss working in baseball?”

Students ask me this often; then they ask what it was like to work in baseball, in sports, for a Major League baseball team.

I have often blogged about how working in baseball changed my life in so many ways. I became a serious student when I got my job with the Orioles as a sophomore in college. I learned how to budget my time and work long hours. I loved every minute of it. I even roped my best friend and college roommate into working there during my second year when I supervised a small staff and someone quit before Opening Day. She was supposed to be a fill-in and ended up staying the entire season…and then some. I grew up there and stayed for 13 total seasons. My best friends are from there. I met my husband there. I learned valuable skills that I now teach my students. I learned about the game, its history, and its pomp and circumstance—all of which I treasure.

Then I wrote a fictional novel about working in baseball entitled Baseball Girl, summoning my recollections and stories about working in the game.

On Friday night, I had the wonderful opportunity to spend time with my mentor and dear friend, Dr. Charles Steinberg, in Boston. Our students and faculty were in town for a communication convention, and Charles, who now works for the Red Sox and Pawtucket Paw Sox, took us out to dinner. It’s funny how things come around full circle—I learned so much of what I know from Charles and Julie Wagner, and both are still my dear friends and mentors. Both Charles and Julie also wrote a case study for a textbook my colleagues and I wrote about event planning. Sitting at that table with Charles made me realize a couple of things: (1) how thankful I am that I had the job I had for all those years and that it helps me in my current job today, and (2) that strong friendships sustain themselves even when you don’t see each other as often as you would like.

Charles and me from Saturday night in Boston at Pico Niccolo.

Today is Opening Day, and I will not be there at Camden Yards to celebrate its 25th season at the ballpark. I have to teach my classes.

I was there on Opening Day 1992 when Camden Yards took center stage, and I helped coordinate the opening ceremonies. I value all of my time there—first as assistant director of community relations and then as director of publishing. For fun, and at Charles’s request, I even spent time as the ballpark deejay for a while, spinning tunes and getting the crowd fired up.

So the question remains: “Do you miss working in baseball?”

On days like today, with a fresh season upon us, a new team, and a clean slate with 162 games to go and a chance to win a World Series ring as a member of the front office, the answer is simply…

Yes.

Sometimes I do.

Good friends…

Stephanie Verni is Professor of Business Communication at Stevenson University and is the author of the newly releasedInn SignificantBaseball Girl, and Beneath the Mimosa Tree.  Along with her colleagues Leeanne Bell McManus and Chip Rouse, she is a co-author of Event Planning: Communicating Theory and Practice, published by Kendall-Hunt.  To visit Stephanie’s Amazon Author page and see her books, click here.

About Creative Writing, Creativity

Random Thoughts on a Gloomy Day

When I put a call for help out there last night—WHAT SHOULD I BLOG ABOUT?—I got an answer from a friend of mine. She suggested that I write down random thoughts over the course of 24 hours. That’s a big challenge and a lot of hours, but I came away with these random thoughts and thought I’d share them with you on this very gloomy April day.

My thoughts are below, but I also created a mind map–creativity and thoughts in action–and included it here.

Steph's Mind Map

Golfer Ben Crenshaw’s wife looks amazing…Jordan Spieth’s poise and command was incredible to watch at this year’s Masters…I’m proud of my son for making the tennis team and he’s still working hard on his golf game…I love that I have a bike with a basket…As long as Kelly Clarkson and Pink and normal folk are comfortable in their own skin, that’s what matters…I’m happy that April showers bring May flowers, but winters in Maryland seem to go on and on, and we are incredibly thankful when we have a burst of warmth and sun like we did yesterday when it hit 80 degrees…I’m not at all ready for bathing suit weather…My students did a great job on writing their memoirs; I’m very proud of them…Opening Day was great, but I look forward to going to a game and sitting in seats when it’s sunny…I wonder if Sara Gruen’s new book will be as good as Water for Elephants…Will I ever write and publish another novel?…The Girl on the Train was very good, even though I’m typically not a thriller reader…Four weeks of school left until summer break…Can’t wait…Went to the doctor and got some medicine for my sinus infection, a bad one this time, and she gave me a steroid, too. Maybe I’ll be able to hit a home run or two after I finish this round…I miss traveling and being carefree like I was in my twenties…Dealing with a pre-teen girl is not always easy, is it?…Can’t wait to see how this textbook on event planning that I’m writing with colleagues turns out; I’ve never tackled anything like this before…When I read old poetry that I’ve written I can get very melancholy, but I think that’s the point of poetry to begin with—to get our inner-most feelings out…Why is it so difficult to market your own, independent novel?…My friend Jenny got a puppy and I can’t wait to meet her. My daughter will be thrilled, too!…Why don’t my clothes fit like they used to?…Why does gravity seem to work double-time as you get older?…Why do people rely on text messages so much?…Why can women be unkind to other women?…How does an act of forgiveness free you?…Who is the most important person in your life? Who has done the most for you? Who loves you unconditionally?…What am I going to make for dinner?

On Life

The Way I See Baseball: Waiting to Hear the Crack of the Bat

Camden Yards and a Win!

***

Mother Nature has blessed us with an incredible day. It’s sunny and warm, and now it’s official: I yearn to hear the crack of the baseball bat. I’m ready for Orioles baseball and for Opening Day at Camden Yards in Baltimore. It’s still in my blood.

For thirteen years of my life, I bled black and orange. As a front office employee for the Baltimore Orioles many moons ago, I looked forward to the season starting. It was a sign of spring and rebirth. Baseball is America’s pastime.

Some say baseball is slow moving, that it can be equated with watching the grass grow. As for me, I can’t think of a better way to spend a few hours than breathing in the scents of the ballpark, listening to the roar of the crowd, and taking in the scenery that was my home for many years. There’s nothing more exciting than winning the game in the bottom of the ninth inning or witnessing a come-from-behind game-winning homer.

I’m sentimental about Camden Yards, and I have every right to be. I essentially grew up there. That place launched my career, and I’ll always be thankful for that. My best friends and I met and married people we worked with, and we’re all still a tight-knit group. My dear friend, Julie Wagner, was inducted into the Orioles Hall of Fame, the only female from the front office to be so honored for her community outreach. We were all there as she graciously accepted her place in the lineup that included many Hall of Fame players such as Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, and Cal Ripken. If it weren’t for her, I would never have experienced working for a major league baseball team because she was the one who hired me in the first place.

My passion may run deeper for Orioles baseball than it would for other people. Other folks may just love to go see their favorite team play. As for me, when I sit in the stands now, not as an employee, but as a regular fan, try as I might, I’ll never be just a regular fan. I’ll always be connected to that place. I can’t help but to be reminded of the love that surrounded me during those years, of the experiences I gained, and the people I met along the way. I’m guessing that a fair amount of black and orange is still in my veins.

I love the game of baseball, and I’ll be there on April 6 as I wait patiently to hear that first crack of the bat.

Some of the crew at a reunion of sorts last year.