On Life

Mimosa Sunday

Mimosa2
Photo: Stephanie Verni

Who doesn’t love Sunday brunch? Besides the delectable French toast, Ricotta pancakes, and fresh fruit, the best part about having brunch with friends and family is that it’s Mimosa Sunday—time for a little champagne and orange juice. It’s believed that Mimosas have been around since 1925 when it was first served at the Hotel Ritz Paris by Frank Meier.

Mimosa1
Photo: Stephanie Verni
Mimosa3
Photo: Stephanie Verni

Besides being very easy to make, Mimosas are colorful and add life to your table. Additionally, they can be garnished with fruits or herbs to dress them up. You can serve them in any style glass you would like, and that choice may depend upon the table setting itself.

Probably what I love best about Mimosas is that they are named after one of my favorite trees—the Mimosa tree—and it was the title of my first book Beneath the Mimosa Tree. When I was a little girl, we had a Mimosa tree in our backyard, and it was always my favorite tree, with its delicate leaves that curl up and sleep at night and its beautiful pink blossoms that give the tree its personality. In my novel, Michael and Annabelle, the two main characters, fall in love “beneath the mimosa tree.” I could have picked from an assortment of trees—Oak trees, Weeping Willows, Maple trees—but to me, Mimosa trees are the most romantic.

So add a little romance to your life today—perhaps with a Mimosa drink—and possibly with Michael and Annabelle as they discover whether forgiveness can be found after love has fallen apart. I think if they fell in love under a Mimosa, it might have a happy ending.

Cheers!

Photo credit: Jen O'Leary
Photo credit: Jen O’Leary

Mimosa Recipe from Rachael Ray & the Food Network

Servings 4

  • 8 ounces orange juice
  • 1 (750 ml) bottle dry champagne
  • 2 ounces triple sec or 2 ounces orange liqueur
  • orange rind, curls (to garnish)

Directions

  1. Rinse and chill 4 champagne flutes in freezer to from the glasses.
  2. Pour 2 ounces of orange juice into each flute.
  3. Fill almost to rim with champagne.
  4. Top each glass with a splash of Triple Sec and garnish with orange curl.

     

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