About Creative Writing

The Fortune Teller: A Piece of Flash Fiction

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Palm Reading: A Little Guide to Life’s Secrets by Dennis Fairchild

What is Flash Fiction? It’s telling a short story in a limited amount of words. Some call Flash Fiction a story in 300 words, 500 words, or under 1,000 words. There are varying degrees of word counts for this type of writing, and some Flash Fiction definitions include a word count of 1,500 words. In today’s case, I’ve told a little story in 586 words. Usually with Flash Fiction, there is a clear beginning, a middle, and a wrap up.

THE FORTUNE TELLER

“That boy loves you,” the old woman next door calls to me as she sees Sam drive away. She is sitting on her stoop in the 98 degree weather, her hair in old-fashioned rollers, as she wears socks with her slip-ons. The look on her face indicates that she wants me to engage in further conversation. We have been friendly since we’ve lived next to each other in the row homes of Baltimore, but have never had a long, in-depth conversation.

“He may, but he’s leaving,” I say.

“Probably for the best,” she replies.

I’ve lived beside her for almost a year, and she pretty much keeps to herself. She knows nothing of my personal life. Her name’s Mable, and I’ve heard others on the block refer to her as “the palm reader,” though she has no official business. I don’t believe in fortune-tellers and have never engaged in any sort of it.

“Come here,” she says. “I’ll show you.”

For curiosity’s sake, I walk down from where I am, and climb the four steps to meet her. I’m tempted to see what she knows, trying not to let the tears fall in front of her. Her appearance alone warrants concern; there seems to be a twitch in her eye, and she’s wearing more mascara than a runway model. It looks uneven and gloppy. It is difficult to take her seriously.

She stretches out her hand and asks for my palm. I extend my hand and turn my palm over for her to see.

She examines it. “There is a lot of passion, here,” she’s pointing to the line that runs up across my palm in a curve where the line ends at the base of my fingertips. “There’s a great deal of love for that boy.”

I nod.

“However, you will not see him again after today,” she says.

I feel a lump build in my throat.

She continues to look at my hand. “You have a good career, but you’re not quite sure if you want to stay in it. You’re thinking of uprooting yourself and moving someplace far away.”

I get a little chill up my spine. I’ve had this particular thought for the last two weeks, and I’ve told no one. Not even Sam. Not my own parents, or my best friend, Ava.

She focuses on one particular line on my hand, tracing it with her fingertip. She looks puzzled.

“Interesting,” she says.

“What?” I ask, now confused.

“You will travel. You will go where you’ve decided to go, and you will be happy.”

“Without Sam,” I say, more as a statement than a question.

“Yes,” she says. “There will be passion again, but only if you go.”

Sam and I have been together for a year. However, I can’t be with him long term, nor should we ever have been together. Sam is unhappily married. He lives apart from his wife, but they are not formally divorced. Nor are there any plans for them to be so. The passion with which Mable speaks is true; it currently exists, but it is a sick, twisted, unhealthy passion, and it has become the ruin of me.

Three weeks ago, I was offered an opportunity to work for my friend’s father’s business in Rome. I’ve always wanted to go abroad, and have seriously contemplated accepting it.

Mable is offbeat, quirky, and possibly the worst dressed person I have ever seen, but something tells me to listen. Something makes me take her seriously.

And sometimes, you just feel it yourself from deep inside.

2 thoughts on “The Fortune Teller: A Piece of Flash Fiction”

  1. You left me speechless! I cannot wait to put my hands on Beneath the Mimosa Tree now ! O.O

    😀

    It is short but so POWERFUL and trust me you just conveyed some kind of energy through it … easily felt!

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